Brazil's land grabbers are posting the plots they’re selling on Facebook because the lawbreakers say they have virtually no fear of prosecution. Facebook said that it was “ready to work with the local authorities” to investigate the alleged crimes but that it would not be taking action on its own.
Strong opinions about the gravity of the Covid outbreak in Brazil and international comparisons. Read Sue Branford's post and join the discussion on Facebook.
Vale mining is finally forced to pay compensation to Minas Gerais state, but the victims of the Brumadinho disaster are not consulted. In Chile, Antofagasta mining faces strike action. From LAB's London Mining Network blog.
Geomapping has enabled quilombola communities in Goiás state, Brazil, to demarcate their land, apply for titles and mount a defence against invading soya farmers, ranchers, miners and land thieves. They are now receiving international recognition.
Confronted with the denial of science, racism and land-greed of the modern 'colonisers', indigenous communities decided to resist and are receiving international recognition for their work.
While the pandemic rages and Bolsonaro and his ministers ignore or belittle its effects, indigenous communities face renewed invasion by miners, loggers and land thieves who bring infection with them
Brazil’s indigenous peoples face the most serious threats since the military dictatorship: a government determined to eliminate their rights, abolish their culture and ‘integrate’ them into an ultra-neoliberal economy; and a pandemic to which they are particularly vulnerable and which threatens their very existence. This first of three articles examines the history of 'pandemonium'
Covid 19 will affect Brazil’s indigenous groups for many years, not only because of the number of lives it has taken but also because among those dead are many important indigenous leaders. LAB briefly profiles one important leader who recently succumbed to the disease.
Extraordinary history of groups of former slaves, indigenous and others in the Cerrado who have forged a sustainable lifestyle from gathering sought-after sempre-vivas flowers and selling them, with enormous care to preserve the environment. Now rewarded by the UN's FAO, they face encroachments from mining and a national park

Water for life, not for death

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Five years since the collapse of the Fundão tailings dam in Minas Gerais, Brazil, communities are still waiting for justice, compensation and the means of rebuilding their shattered lives

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