Saturday, July 24, 2021
Mineração Rio do Norte (MRN), the world’s fourth largest bauxite producer, encroached on riverine communities beside the Trombetas River in the Brazilian Amazon in the 1970s. Over the years, MRN became notorious for its contamination of local waters with bauxite mining waste, residents say.To resolve that problem, the company built 26 tailings dams. The largest of these waste-holding impoundments...
AHRC funded Project: “Challenges and Risks Faced by Indigenous Peoples in Today’s Brazil: Unpacking Vulnerability and Multiple Reactions" Following the original research plan, the activities of the project started in February 2020 with a meeting of the research team at Unicamp (Brazil) and an additional (virtual) meeting of the Steering Group in April. Unfortunately, despite all the enthusiasm of the research...
Brazilian partners in the Indigenous Brazil Violated project, led by Dr Jones Goettert, collected food and cleaning/sanitizing products and delivered them to Guarani-Kaiowá communities. The delivery was arranged and funded by the IBV project.
Frontiers of Development in the Amazon: Riches, Risks, and Resistances contributes to ongoing debates on the processes of change in the Amazon, a region inherently tied to the expansion of internal and external socio-economic and environmental frontiers. This book offers interdisciplinary analyses from a range of scholars in Europe, Latin America, and the United States that question the rationale...
ABSTRACT: Frontiers of national development and agricultural expansion constitute spaces of intense interaction, disputes and contestation. The Brazilian economy continues to largely rely on the opening of agribusiness frontiers in the west of country and, similar to what happened in the past, this is a phenomenon shaped by acute racism and discrimination against the Indigenous population. This article is...

Amazonia in 5 minutes

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the first episode of a weekly podcast, “Amazonia in Five Minutes,” presented by Jessica Carey-Webb. The podcast highlights publications from Amazonia Latitude’s magazine as well as cultural tips, in a dynamic and melodic format, to the tune of local rhythms.
COVID-19 kills the elderly, those with underlying health conditions, the poor and vulnerable. It is now doing so in the Brazilian Amazon where the virus killed nine Munduruku indigenous elders in just a few days. Forest people elders are typically leaders and keepers of culture, so their loss is especially destabilizing.Officially, 218 indigenous people had died of COVID-19 and...
As Covid-19 affects older people more fatally, many indigenous leaders are dying, taking with them precious knowledge
This article was first published by Mongabay on 27 May. You can read the original here.In April an official from IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental agency was violently assaulted by loggers and needed hospital treatment in Pará state. The incident was caught on video.The IBAMA operation was targeting illegal deforestation carried out by land grabbers, wishing to convert large areas of...
This article was edited by LAB. The authors’ original text (in Portuguese) can be found here. The authors argue that the acceleration of Amazonian deforestation and environmental degradation —powered by successive blows from Bolsonaro’s government to neuter environmental protection policies — in a region where public healthcare is at best precarious, has amplified the lethality of diseases, especially Covid-19. Removing protection...

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