The documentary Mothers of the Land serves as an eye-opening report on the daily lives of female farmers in Peru, and how their traditional way of life is threatened by the modern maladies of capitalism and climate change.
The pro-government majority in the lower house of the congress has rushed through a bill (PL3792) which will virtually eliminate the need for Brazil’s environmental licences for a wide range of economic activities, opening the way for widespread exploitation. The activities which will be freed from licensing include agriculture, cattle raising, logging, dam and road building, sewage plants and water management.
A beautifully filmed celebration of traditional ways of knowing, this documentary offers an alternative vision of what true wealth is and what is at stake in the struggle to protect biodiversity.
LAB co-hosts a screening of two beautiful Peruvian documentaries about land, cultivation, resistance and climate change
Despairing of any action by the Bolsonaro government, Brazil's MST movement of landless workers organizes rural communities to defend themselves, isolating but maintaining production and supporting members
Itamar Vieira Júnior's multi award-winning novel gives a voice to silenced Black, Indigenous and Quilombola communities who have fought for their land rights for hundreds of years.
Kadiwéu people from Mato Grosso do Sul have survived against the odds. Now their eye-catching traditional designs are being used on fashionable bags and dresses. Will they benefit, and will they survive deforestation and the pandemic?
In 2017, a group of women activists in Cajamarca began documenting their perceptions of community, wellbeing and alternatives to extractivism through photography.
Brazil's land grabbers are posting the plots they’re selling on Facebook because the lawbreakers say they have virtually no fear of prosecution. Facebook said that it was “ready to work with the local authorities” to investigate the alleged crimes but that it would not be taking action on its own.
Brazil’s indigenous peoples face the most serious threats since the military dictatorship: a government determined to eliminate their rights, abolish their culture and ‘integrate’ them into an ultra-neoliberal economy; and a pandemic to which they are particularly vulnerable and which threatens their very existence. This first of three articles examines the history of 'pandemonium'

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