Sunday, October 24, 2021
Extraordinary history of groups of former slaves, indigenous and others in the Cerrado who have forged a sustainable lifestyle from gathering sought-after sempre-vivas flowers and selling them, with enormous care to preserve the environment. Now rewarded by the UN's FAO, they face encroachments from mining and a national park

Water for life, not for death

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Five years since the collapse of the Fundão tailings dam in Minas Gerais, Brazil, communities are still waiting for justice, compensation and the means of rebuilding their shattered lives
Prominent Bolivian miners' leader Orlando Gutierrez died In October. Was he injured in a fall at his home, or was he the victim of a right-wing attack?
Many communities remain unsafe and uncompensated in Brumadinho, Brazil, two years after the worst dam disaster in Latin American history at the Córrego do Feijão iron ore mine in south-eastern Brazil on 25 January, 2018, which left up to 270 people dead.

The Rights of Nature Movement

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Ashaninka women in Tsiquireni, in the shores of Ene River. April 2012. Photo/Tomas Munita
A recent report, published by the Cyrus R. Vance Centre for International Justice, Earth Law Centre and International Rivers has found that the movement to grant legal rights to rivers and the natural environment is rapidly gaining momentum around the world.
British businessman and football club owner, Joe Lewis, has created resistance from the indigenous community by purchasing and developing their ancestral lands in Rio Negro, Argentina. Lewis blocks access to the land, where he has hosted Israeli soldiers and former right-wing President Mauricio Macri.
he crowdfunding campaign for The Heart of Our Earth, our project dedicated to community resistance to mining in Latin America, came to an end on 23 December. The Crowdfunding campaign raised just under £9,000, while two separate large donations to the project added a futher £7,250 yielding a magnificent total of approximately £16,250.
Ever since the arrival of Spanish Conquistadors in the 16th century, many outsiders have followed the example of these bold European adventurers along with the crown heads of Europe in seeing South America as a treasure house of mineral wealth.
This is the second post in the new London Mining Network blog, a partnership initiative between LAB and LMN. Cerrejón’s ‘agreement’ with Wayúu community comes as news to them; Chubut communities mobilise again; updates from Brazil, Bolivia and Peru.
Residents of traditional communities in the Brazilian Amazon municipality of Barcarena, near the mouth of the Amazon River, say that their subsistence and commercial livelihoods, and their health, have been destroyed by an invasion of mining companies which began in the mid-1980’s. This story is the fifth in a series.

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