Geomapping has enabled quilombola communities in Goiás state, Brazil, to demarcate their land, apply for titles and mount a defence against invading soya farmers, ranchers, miners and land thieves. They are now receiving international recognition.
Building on the Voices book published in January 2019, the authors of Voices are back to provide an update on Latin America’s new activism. We will be discussing Latin America’s developments from the past few years and talking about how social activists have adapted to new challenges.
Over the years, homes and whole neighbourhoods have been built close to or on the tracks of a disused railway. Now the Tren Maya project threatens to evict them, while offering compensation and relocation in which they have little faith
Rafael Zafra asks what happened to the cholombianos, the urban tribe portrayed in Fernando Frías de la Parra's Oscar-nominated film 'I'm No Longer Here'.
Confronted with the denial of science, racism and land-greed of the modern 'colonisers', indigenous communities decided to resist and are receiving international recognition for their work.
While the pandemic rages and Bolsonaro and his ministers ignore or belittle its effects, indigenous communities face renewed invasion by miners, loggers and land thieves who bring infection with them
Brazil’s indigenous peoples face the most serious threats since the military dictatorship: a government determined to eliminate their rights, abolish their culture and ‘integrate’ them into an ultra-neoliberal economy; and a pandemic to which they are particularly vulnerable and which threatens their very existence. This first of three articles examines the history of 'pandemonium'
Architect, urbanist and previous executive Director of Fundación Crecer in Guatemala City, Ninotchka Matute stresses the need to shift the urban imaginary in her native Guatemala City, by reframing derelict spaces as those of potential

Latin America is Moving

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A new online seminar series from the Latin America is Moving Collective will explore Latin American social movements before and after the pandemic.
A small community takes on mining giant Anglo American which drains aquifers of water while households are forced to queue at water tankers ... just part of Chile's dictatorship legacy where water, like everything else, is a trade commodity

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