News

Brazil's indigenous peoples took their struggle to Brasilia, to protest against PL 490, a law being debated in congress, which would further weaken their rights and accelerate the land theft which has stripped them of their lands
The Uru-eu-wau-wau in Rondônia state sealed off their territory in March 2020. In a new video, they narrate how they survived the pandemic for more than a year with no major cases.
During a temporary exhibition at Salvador's Museum of Modern Art of Bahia, Indigenous artists took over the curation in a temporary, symbolic ‘retomada’.
Telling the story of a collective act of creativity — to create a monument in memory of the 19 landless farmers killed on 17 April 1996 at the massacre of Eldorado dos Carajás, in southern Pará and to mark 25 years of resistance and struggle for social and environmental justice by the Landless People’s Movement […]
Munduruku people on the Tapajós tributary of the Amazon are engaged in a struggle for survival against the long-term effects of mercury poisoning from gold mining, a new influx of illegal miners and the Covid infection they bring with them.
Kadiwéu people from Mato Grosso do Sul have survived against the odds. Now their eye-catching traditional designs are being used on fashionable bags and dresses. Will they benefit, and will they survive deforestation and the pandemic?
Confronted with the denial of science, racism and land-greed of the modern 'colonisers', indigenous communities decided to resist and are receiving international recognition for their work.
While the pandemic rages and Bolsonaro and his ministers ignore or belittle its effects, indigenous communities face renewed invasion by miners, loggers and land thieves who bring infection with them
Brazil’s indigenous peoples face the most serious threats since the military dictatorship: a government determined to eliminate their rights, abolish their culture and ‘integrate’ them into an ultra-neoliberal economy; and a pandemic to which they are particularly vulnerable and which threatens their very existence. This first of three articles examines the history of 'pandemonium'
Covid 19 will affect Brazil’s indigenous groups for many years, not only because of the number of lives it has taken but also because among those dead are many important indigenous leaders. LAB briefly profiles one important leader who recently succumbed to the disease.