Splendidly Chilean video from #ganadecambiarestepaisculiao and EstoNoParaNo, urging young people to vote in the 25 October plebiscite to determine whether a new constitution will be drawn up and, if so, by what method. It's notable that Chilean Spanish is so idiomatic that subtitles are necessary even for Spanish speakers!
This is a condensed version of a longer article written in July 2020. It was edited for LAB by Emily Gregg. Indigenous territories in Latin America are critical areas where the COVID-19 has had a major impact on vulnerable communities. The Atacama people in Antofagasta, Chile, are one example of how these communities...
© Luis Bustamente
Luis Bustamante's images of Chile's estallido social - which began on October 18, 2019, now a whole year ago - speak for themselves. Most were taken of protesters in Santiago around Plaza Baquedano, renamed by protestors as Plaza de la Diginidad. Others cover graffiti and stencil work that popped up during this period, taken in a range of Chilean cities.
Chile's constitution is a legacy of the Pinochet dictatorship and has come to symbolise the embedded inequalities that sparked a year of mounting popular protestsThe plebiscite on 25 October must determine whether to start the process of drawing up a new constitution and how the process will be conductedEven if the plebiscite endorses both the change and...
As the date for Chile's constitutional plebiscite nears, the country is increasingly polarised. Polls, however, show a large majority in favour of a new constitution being drawn up by a constituent assembly of citizens, not a joint citizen-Congress committee.
This three-part podcast by the Manics' James Dean Bradfield looks at the lasting influence which Chilean musician and revolutionary singer, Victor Jara, has had on modern music.
Britain and the Dictatorships of Argentina and Chile 1973-82: Foreign Policy, Corporations and Social Movements by Grace Livingstone, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018. ISBN: 978-3-030-08666-4 Reviewed for LAB by Pablo Bradbury Ask anyone active in the British left during the 1970s and 1980s and they are likely to remember stories about Chile:...
This important article was originally published in Spanish in August 2019 (read the original here). Cristina Flores has translated it for LAB as a contribution to our ongoing project Voices of Latin America, represented by our book of that name, and the ongoing website which continues the work of the book.
Chile's protests were thwarted when the arrival of Coronavirus forced the population to stay at home. As the impact of the quarantine takes its toll and people are becoming desperate for food, one art collective is censored and attacked for highlighting the struggle. Main image courtesy of _dibujossad.
This is the second of two articles with testimony from Chile’s protest movements. The first can be read here. See also our January article 'Chile's long hot summer of discontent' Stop Press: there were new street protests in Santiago over the weekend of 16-17 April in...

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