Sunday, January 23, 2022
Home Voices Chapter 7 - Mining and communities

Chapter 7 - Mining and communities

New books from LAB authors

0
LAB authors have published three new books - on indigenous communities vs extractive industries in Ecuador; and on the military dictatorship, torture and human rights in Brazil
'La Boiada - beef cattle in the Amazon
The Bolsonaro government's assault on regulations and indigenous rights has led to a stampede of land-grabbing by loggers, miners and cattle ranchers. They have let through the stampede (passar a boiada).
In Guatemala, environmental defenders are criminalised, evicted, beaten, imprisoned and sometimes killed. It is one of the most dangerous places in the world for those who seek to defend their communities, lands and environment.
Chile: BHP forced to halt mining
It's not all plain sailing for mining companies. Communities at Cerro Colorado in Chile have put up stiff opposition to BHP, whose mine threatens water supplies from a key a key aquifer. And peasants in Huamachuco, Peru, staged a massive protest against mining in their province.
Río Turbio: women marginalised by the mine
Shady River (Río Turbio), named after the mining town in northwest Argentina in which it is set, explores the gendered space of the mine, giving voice to a collective of marginalised women and shedding light on the tragedies that haunt the town of Río Turbio. 

El Salvador: the Water Defenders

0
Water Defenders El Salvador
In The Water Defenders: How Ordinary People Saved A Country from Corporate Greed, Robin Broad and John Cavanagh tell the harrowing, inspiring saga of Salvadorans' fight — and historic victory — to save their water, and their communities, from Big Gold.
A proposal to start large-scale mining for lithium in Cornwall, UK, raises all the same issues as seen in Chile, Bolivia and Argentina. It's a timely reminder that mining is not just a problem for poorer countries.
As the drive to expand renewable energy capacity speeds up, there is a rush for lithium and other materials around the world. What will the expansion of rare earth mining in Latin America mean for the indigenous communities and workers who have historically borne the harms of extractivism?
At Espinar in Peru and on Chile's Colina river, major international mining companies are once more in the spotlight, suspected of causing pollution, denying responsibility and failing to consult local communities
Communities awaiting compensation from the worst environmental disaster in Brazilian history say they’re being stymied by a convoluted legal process that favors those responsible.

Stay in touch

4,067FansLike
3,115FollowersFollow
64SubscribersSubscribe