Home Blogs Book and Film Reviews

Book and Film Reviews

In recent years, this highest award in the filmmaking business has been kind to Latin American filmmakers, especially Mexican directors: Since 2014 five directing awards were won by Alfonso Cuarón (for Gravity in 2014 and Roma in 2019), Alejandro González Iñárritu (for Birdman in 2015 and The Revenant in 2016), and Guillermo del Toro (for The Shape of Water in 2018). The Oscars 2021 submissions from Latin America are:
Ventana Sur 2020
Ventana Sur has indisputably become a key event in the film industry calendar and, since its creation in 2009, has played a significant role in bringing Latin American cinema to the rest of the world. This year’s edition is set to unveil a wealth of burgeoning talents and new and exciting audiovisual content.
Peru’s official contender for the Oscars, Song Without A Name (Canción sin nombre) follows a young indigenous woman as she searches for her child, stolen at birth in a fake health clinic in Lima.
Camila Freitas’ documentary Landless (Chão, 2019) follows the struggle of the MST – the Landless Workers’ Movement in Brazil ­– as they strive for reform and access to land.
Narratives of Vulnerability in Mexico, by Raúl Diego Rivera Hernández, translated by Isis Sadek. Published by Palgrave Macmillan (2020) ISBN 978-3-030-51144-9. People in the United States are familiar with the U.S. war on drugs but less so with Mexico’s and, even less with the...
For LAB's online book launch event, Journalist Sue Branford and writer and translator, Tom Gatehouse, interview Bernardo Kucinski about his recent novel 'The Past Is An Imperfect Tense' and read extracts from the book, translated into English by Tom Gatehouse and published by Practical Action Publishing.
Serena Chang reviews the new LAB publication, 'The Past is an Imperfect Tense’ by Bernardo Kucinkski, translated by Tom Gatehouse.
Britain and the Dictatorships of Argentina and Chile 1973-82: Foreign Policy, Corporations and Social Movements by Grace Livingstone, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018. ISBN: 978-3-030-08666-4 Reviewed for LAB by Pablo Bradbury Ask anyone active in the British left during the 1970s and 1980s and they are likely to remember stories about Chile:...
Book review The Violence of Democracy - Political Life in Postwar El Salvador  By: Ainhoa Montoya Published: 2018, Palgrave Macmillan, 303 pp, £17.99 paperback, £13.99 e-book. You can order a copy here. Reviewed by: Mogs Russell

Stay in touch

3,863FansLike
2,350FollowersFollow
84SubscribersSubscribe