Sunday, September 19, 2021
As the drive to expand renewable energy capacity speeds up, there is a rush for lithium and other materials around the world. What will the expansion of rare earth mining in Latin America mean for the indigenous communities and workers who have historically borne the harms of extractivism? Thea Riofrancos, author of Resource Radicals (Duke University Press, 2020), explains how the energy transition in the Global North risks being anything but just without structural changes to supply chains and the governance of extractive industries.

Peru: Stand with Máxima

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A classic David-and-Goliath story, MAXIMA follows the efforts of an indigenous Peruvian farmer and activist, Máxima Acuña, in her battle to protect her land, water and dignity.
Haiti is not unfamiliar with violent uprisings. However, since the US-backed installation of Jovenel Moïse in 2004, unrest has been relentless, with violence and repression reaching a bloody crescendo in recent weeks.
Plans to build a massive EHV 230 kV power line 225 kms long from Óbidos in Pará state across the Amazon river to Parintins in Amazonas state, are being rushed through without prior consultation with the quilombola and riverine communities that will be affected. The power company applied for the provisional environmental permit to be set aside on the...
Venezuela, whose economy is already in dire straits thanks to US sanctions and its own mismanagement, risks losing control of the Texas-based oil company CITGO, currently owned by Petróleos de Venezuela, and valued at US$8 billion. Bond-holders, the Trump administration and a Canadian mining company are circling the prey. The only, slim chance seems to be if the government...

The Condor and the Eagle

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The Condor and the Eagle (2019) is a prize-winning documentary film directed by Sophie and Clément Guerra, about the collective struggle of the Indigenous peoples of North and South America to defend their land and water against the oil and mining companies that have occupied and desecrated their homelands and their environment. Screening in London...
Written for LAB by William Costa 'We were very happy when we lived on the banks of the Paraná River. We had our houses, we had our animals and our mint crops, which we sold on the Brazilian side of the river', says Carmen Martínez. With notable melancholy, the 84-year-old says that she does not know how to begin talking...
A project called 'Talking to Goliath' has mapped social and environmental conflicts across the length and breadth of Mexico, caused by the development, expansion or operation of mining, oil exploration and drillling, wind-power and hydroelectric projects. FLACSO Mexico, in partnership with De Montfort University, Leicester, UK has produced a detailed map of Mexico with coloured markers to indicate the site...
The Brazilian state of Roraima is currently dependent for 70 percent of its power on Venezuela’s Guri hydroelectric dam. But socioeconomic chaos in Venezuela, and deteriorating political relations between the two nations, have caused Brazil to fast-track a 750-kilometer transmission line to replace the imported energy.General Otávio Rêgo de Barros, using a national...
The Belo Monte dam, now under construction in the Amazon, is heralded as an abundant power source for Brazil’s burgeoning economy. But critics contend the project’s benefits are outweighed by the environmental and social costs. In a Yale Environment 360 video report, Charles Lyons explores both sides of this controversial project. Full video and ...

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