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Chapter 5 - Indigenous peoples and the rights of nature

Peru: Stand with Máxima

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A classic David-and-Goliath story, MAXIMA follows the efforts of an indigenous Peruvian farmer and activist, Máxima Acuña, in her battle to protect her land, water and dignity.
On Sunday, thousands of Peruvians flocked to social media to debate the validity of the Spanish language term 'cosecha de agua' (water harvesting). This virtual war of words followed political sparring earlier that day when Peru’s presidential candidates took to the podium in the southern city of Arequipa for their second and final televised debate prior to the runoff...
The documentary Mothers of the Land serves as an eye-opening report on the daily lives of female farmers in Peru, and how their traditional way of life is threatened by the modern maladies of capitalism and climate change.
A beautifully filmed celebration of traditional ways of knowing, this documentary offers an alternative vision of what true wealth is and what is at stake in the struggle to protect biodiversity.
Communities awaiting compensation from the worst environmental disaster in Brazilian history say they’re being stymied by a convoluted legal process that favors those responsible.
Telling the story of a collective act of creativity -- to create a monument in memory of the 19 landless farmers killed on 17 April 1996 at the massacre of Eldorado dos Carajás, in southern Pará and to mark 25 years of resistance and struggle for social and environmental justice by the Landless People's Movement (MST). Rios de Encontro is...
The Latin America Bureau (LAB) invites you to the third instalment of our Voices of Latin America webinar series: The Rights of Nature and Indigenous Peoples.
Munduruku people on the Tapajós tributary of the Amazon are engaged in a struggle for survival against the long-term effects of mercury poisoning from gold mining, a new influx of illegal miners and the Covid infection they bring with them.
Kadiwéu people from Mato Grosso do Sul have survived against the odds. Now their eye-catching traditional designs are being used on fashionable bags and dresses. Will they benefit, and will they survive deforestation and the pandemic?
Brazil's land grabbers are posting the plots they’re selling on Facebook because the lawbreakers say they have virtually no fear of prosecution. Facebook said that it was “ready to work with the local authorities” to investigate the alleged crimes but that it would not be taking action on its own.

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