Monday, October 18, 2021
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Culture, Music, Film, Photography

Shady River (Río Turbio), named after the mining town in northwest Argentina in which it is set, explores the gendered space of the mine, giving voice to a collective of marginalised women and shedding light on the tragedies that haunt the town of Río Turbio. 

Stepping softly on the earth

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A new film from Marcos Colón interviews indigenous leaders from across the Amazon whose thinking could transform our world as modern extraction and exploitation tip us further towards chaos and the destruction of the planet
Victor Jara's 1982 album told the story of the población Herminda de la Victoria. It will be celebrated at this year's El Sueño Existe festival (on Zoom from Machynlleth, Wales). Malcolm Boorer tells the story behind the album.
After a Covid-mandated hiatus in 2020, CASA Festival returns for the whole month of September, to celebrate connection through a programme of exhibition, installation, performance and film.
The short film is intended as an expression of solidarity with the current strike and its title, Desolvido, translates as ‘unforgetting’; evoking a desire not to forget past moments of beauty even in the face of a violent present.
Now aged 90, photographer Claudia Andujar remains deeply concerned for the Yanomami people with whom she says she “totally identified,” noting that the present threat of illegal mining in Indigenous territories is doing far more harm than the government-driven road projects of the 1970s. Andujar’s years of work and life with the Yanomami are now chronicled in a major photo exhibition at London’s Barbican Centre through Aug. 29.
The Uru-eu-wau-wau in Rondônia state sealed off their territory in March 2020. In a new video, they narrate how they survived the pandemic for more than a year with no major cases.
The challenges of creating a collaborative mural in Bogota to represent the perspective of women forced into prostitution by the armed conflict.
The documentary Mothers of the Land serves as an eye-opening report on the daily lives of female farmers in Peru, and how their traditional way of life is threatened by the modern maladies of capitalism and climate change.
In response to and support of nationwide protests across Colombia, artists of all trades have joined in protest through creative expression. Adapted from an article for LAB's partner, Sounds and Colours, here are some of the ways art is enriching the protests, contextualising demands and unifying Colombians.

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