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Drugs & Narcotráfico

The emerging Colombian cannabis market has a predicted value of $54 billion USD by 2025. Its potential to uphold the peace agreement, create jobs for rural farmers and boost the national economy is remarkable, although there are stubborn obstructions to progress.
Filmed over three years between 2017 and 2019, Bajo Fuego is an engaging, enraging portrait of a community’s struggle against state abandonment, economic collapse, and a rising tide of violence
While public demonstrations effect social change around Latin America, violence in Colombia skyrockets. Must the country reach rock bottom before things can change?
Rafael Zafra asks what happened to the cholombianos, the urban tribe portrayed in Fernando Frías de la Parra's Oscar-nominated film 'I'm No Longer Here'.
Narratives of Vulnerability in Mexico, by Raúl Diego Rivera Hernández, translated by Isis Sadek. Published by Palgrave Macmillan (2020) ISBN 978-3-030-51144-9. People in the United States are familiar with the U.S. war on drugs but less so with Mexico’s and, even less with the extent of U.S. involvement in the latter. As any war, the drug war also has countless...
For LAB's online book launch event, Sue Branford and Tom Gatehouse, interview Bernardo Kucinski about his recent novel 'The Past Is An Imperfect Tense' and read extracts from the book, published by Practical Action Publishing.
This article was written by Francisco Gutiérrez Sanín, Professor at the Nacional University in Bogotá Colombia, and a partner on the Drugs & (dis)order Research Project at SOAS, University of London Four years after a Peace Agreement that formally ended more than 60 years of internal conflict, there’s a new wave of violence in Colombia. More than 46 massacres so...
Serena Chang reviews the new LAB publication, 'The Past is an Imperfect Tense’ by Bernardo Kucinkski, translated by Tom Gatehouse.
Crop eradication in Colombia is negating the crop substitution programme, causing violence and undermining the peace process, warns Christian Aid.
Closure of the border with Bolivia in response to covid-19 has exposed a legal vacuum in Argentina surrounding the consumption, importation and cultivation of coca leaves in the country’s northern provinces. Coca leaves have been used for millennia by indigenous groups in the area, as well as in Bolivia, Peru and Colombia, for medicinal and ritualistic purposes. However its usage...

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